Connect with us!
Image may be subject to copyright

area attractions

A year round vacation destination, Natchez has something to offer everyone.

Plenty to do.

Come enjoy the historic city of Natchez... The Mighty Mississippi River, The Antebellum Home Tours, Horse-drawn Carriage Rides, Open Air Tours and More! There is so much to see and do while staying in Natchez, you will have to return!
Antebellum Homes & Historic Plantations
Antebellum Homes & Historic Plantations
The Natchez area is particularly rich in historic plantations, beautiful Antebellum and Victorian homes, all allowing visitors a view of earlier times. Two favorite homes that should not be missed on your getaway include the stunning Longwood Mansion and the Rosalie Mansion on the Mississippi Bluff.
Blues History and Live Music
Blues History and Live Music
You’ll find that Natchez is peppered with informative Mississippi Blues Trail markers, and we’ve upheld this rich tradition in our weekly live music.
Bluff Park
Bluff Park
The greatest natural attraction that Natchez has to offer is the Mississippi River, and the best vantage point from which to take in her beauty and splendor is the bluff. The best time to be on the bluff overlooking the river is at sunset, because, weather permitting, sunsets on the river can be a spectacular sight to behold.
Charboneau Distillery
Charboneau Distillery
Charboneau Distillery LLC is an artisan distillery located in downtown Natchez, in one of the oldest buildings in Mississippi. The distillery's first rum to be bottled and on Mississippi shelves, is white rum; dark rums, aged in small oak whiskey casks, will follow in two to three years. Look for a distinctive bottle design featuring a map of the lower Mississippi River from Greenville to the Gulf-historically sugar cane-growing territory-with Natchez prominently at its epicenter.
Emerald Mound and Windsor Ruins
Emerald Mound and Windsor Ruins
It was built and used by ancestors of the Natchez Indians as a ceremonial center. Hiking to the top will earn you an amazing view. Windsor Ruins are what remains of what was once the largest antebellum Greek-Revival mansion in Mississippi.It was utilized during the Civil War, and sadly destroyed by fire in 1890 from an abandoned lit cigar, but he ruins remain as a Natchez Trace landmark.
Forks of the Road
Forks of the Road
The days of slavery marked a sad and troubling time in our nation’s history, and Natchez has honored those who unwillingly lived their lives in service to wealthy landowners. The site of the Forks of the Road Slave Auction is commemorated with a historic marker.
Grand Village of the Natchez Indians
Grand Village of the Natchez Indians
Located just on the outskirts of town at the edge of a residential area is The Grand Village of the Natchez Indians. The Natchez Indians inhabited what is now southwest Mississippi ca. 700-1730 AD, with the culture at its zenith in the mid-1500s. Between 1682 and 1729 the Grand Village was their main ceremonial center, according to historical and archaeological evidence. French explorers, priests and journalists descriptions of the ceremonial mounds and archaeological investigations produced additional evidence that the site was the place that the French called "the Grand Village of the Natchez Indians." During the period that the Natchez occupied the Grand Village, the French explored the region and began to make settlements. Relations between the French and the Natchez were cordial at first, but deteriorated as various disagreements and episodes of violence arose in 1716 and again in 1723. In 1729, a pro-English element within the tribe led the Natchez to attack the French colonial plantations and military garrison at Fort Rosalie. The French retaliated in such force that the Natchez were forced to abandon their homeland. Put the Grand Village on your tour itinerary and pack a picnic lunch to enjoy on the hallowed grounds of this historic treasure.
Historic Jefferson College
Historic Jefferson College
About eight miles North of Natchez on Highway 61 resides historic Jefferson College, the first educational institution of higher learning in Mississippi. Visitors can tour a restored dormitory room, student dining room, kitchen buildings, and other historic sites. The adjacent nature trail winds up and down through a wooded ravine, past St. Catherine's Creek, over bridges, past Ellicott Springs, and a historic cemetery, with plants and trees clearly identified along the way. Jefferson College, incorporated by an act of the first General Assembly of the Mississippi Territory in 1802, was named in honor of Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States and President of the American Philosophical Society. Territorial governor William C. C. Claiborne served as president of the college's first Board of Trustees. In 1830, the college purchased the Methodist church building that had housed the 1817 Mississippi statehood convention. They renovated it in 1832, and in 1839 completed construction of a new West Wing. Jefferson College is an extraordinary historic property and worth the ten minute drive from downtown to see. It is truly another "must see" to put on your itinerary.
Natchez City Cemetery
Natchez City Cemetery
It may sound a bit grave to consider a cemetery an attraction, but when it comes to the Natchez City Cemetery, and once you learn the history of some of the characters buried there, you'll quickly understand why. Once you enter the gates, you can either begin a self-guided tour following a brochure and map, or you may be interested in hiring a guide so you'll get all the details of the deceased at this historic cemetery You'll hear stories about a woman called Louise the Unfortunate, and a slave named York, or perhaps visit the family plot of famed riverboat Captain, Thomas P. Leathers. The Natchez City Cemetery is listed on the National Register of Historic places, established in 1822 when remains were moved to the present location from Memorial Park (located behind St. Mary's Basilica downtown). Tombstone inscriptions embellished by romantic and mysterious tales draw portraits of the dearly departed interned here. Bring a good pair of walking shoes and make the Natchez City Cemetery a good three hour stop on your itinerary. As historic cemeteries go, it's unforgettable.
Natchez in Historic Photographs
Natchez in Historic Photographs
Natchez is fortunate to have an outstanding collection of photographs depicting life in Natchez and on the riverfront from about 1845 to circa 1910. Family portraits, steamboats laden with enormous bales of cotton, and street scenes throughout the historic downtown area will keep you mesmerized for at least an hour when you tour the gallery. The gallery is located in the Stratton Chapel behind First Presbyterian Church on Pearl St.
Natchez National Historical Park
Natchez National Historical Park
Take a free tour of the grounds at one of Natchez’s most elegant antebellum homes. Exploring the property’s timeless elegance is one of many things to do in Natchez that will take you back in time.
Natchez Trace
Natchez Trace
Stretching 444 miles in length from just outside Natchez to Nashville, Tennessee, the Natchez Trace was a path used by traders and riverboat employees to travel back to their homes in middle America. There are countless historic and notable sites along the Natchez Trace Parkway and breathtaking natural scenery at every turn.
Natchez Visitors Center
Natchez Visitors Center
The facility is a Mississippi Welcome Center and home to the local offices of the National Park Service, Visit Natchez and Natchez Pilgrimage Tours. The facility serves as a one stop venue for tickets to tour the antebellum homes of Natchez, tickets to local events, and travel information in general.
Natchez-Under-the-Hill
Natchez-Under-the-Hill
Sip a beverage on the porch of a vintage tavern and watch the sun set over the river. Long ago Silver Street was a famous hangout for riverboat captains, gamblers, painted ladies and even pirates. Under-the-Hill Saloon, the oldest bar in town, still sparkles with congeniality and fun.
Parks in Natchez
Parks in Natchez
There’s golf and tennis at Duncan Park, a bubbling fountain at Memorial Park, a gazebo, fountain and walking trails overlooking the river at Bluff Park and much more to explore.
The William Johnson House
The William Johnson House
William Johnson was a free man of color in antebellum Natchez. He acquired several building in Natchez, approximately 2,000 acres of land south of town and he owned several slaves. He gained the respect of leading citizens of the time, some of whom he loaned money to, and local papers eulogized him after his untimely death. William Johnson kept a diary for almost sixteen years, from 1835 until his death in 1851. It is the lengthiest and most detailed personal narrative authored by an African American during the antebellum era in the United States. Johnson's diary evolved into an extraordinary record of social, economic, and political life in his hometown of Natchez, Mississippi, as seen through the eyes of a free man of color. Johnson covers everything from the mundane like Johnson's search for a lost cow to the momentous such as former president Andrew Jackson's visit to Natchez. Operated by the National Park Service, William Johnson's House is open seven days a week from 9:00am-4:30 p.m. and is free to the public. It contains a bookstore, exhibit room and fully furnished recreated living quarters.
There are no attractions to show.